Cursa Star – The Giant’s Footstool

Cursa is at 15°17′ Gemini with an orb of  2°00′
Fixed Star Cursa Star Astrology

Eridanus Constellation [Stellarium]

The Sun joins Cursa on June 5

Fixed star Cursa, Beta Eridani, is a 2.8 magnitude topaz yellow star in the River, Eridanus Constellation. The traditional name Cursa comes from the Arabic phrase Al Kursiyy al Jauzah which means the Chair (or Footstool ) of the Central One.

Degree*

08 ♊ 28
09 ♊ 47
15 ♊ 17
16 ♊ 50
20 ♊ 57

Fixed Star

Ain
Aldebaran
Cursa
Rigel
Bellatrix

Orb

1°30′
2°30′
2°00′
2°40′
2°20′

Cursa Star Astrology

Fixed star Cursa, β Eridani, is the  most northerly star in the river and effectively its source spring. At 15°17′ Gemini  it is only 43 from Orion’s foot, Rigel’. The name in fact comes from the Arabic for ‘The Giant’s Footstool’. Although bright it is far outshone by Rigel, and this can be read as the inspiration to set out upon the long quest to the Divine Source of that brightness. The weariness to come, marked by Zaurak, lies far away yet, so Cursa is a Sign of Enthusiasm for the Quest, surely meriting a Jupiter-Mercury simile. Look for that enthusiasm in those who have this star strong and well aspected. [3]

Cursa Star, Beta Eridani

Cursa Star, Beta Eridani [www.snipview.com]

Constellation Eridanus, with the exception of Eridanus, is like Saturn. It gives a love of knowledge and science, much travel and many changes, a position of authority, but danger of accidents especially at sea and of drowning. [1]

This constellation portends rain. Modern astrologers claim that the constellation gives a love of knowledge and science, but there is no support for this contention in classical astrology. Eridanus does, however, indicate events concerned with rivers and streams. Ptolemy states that the star at the end of the river has a nature like that of Jupiter, and the other stars in the constellation have an influence akin to that of Saturn. [2]

References

1. Fixed Stars and Constellations in Astrology, Vivian E. Robson, 1923, p.44.
2. Fixed Stars and Judicial Astrology, George Noonan, 1990, p.61.
3. The Living Stars, Dr. Eric Morse, 1988, p.139.

* All fixed star positions are for the year 2000. Add one degree per 72 years to correct for precession.

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