Mintaka Star – Orion’s Belt

Mintaka is at 22°24′ Gemini with an orb of 2°10′
Fixed Star Mintaka Star Astrology

Orion Constellation [Stellarium]

The Sun joins Mintaka on June 13

Fixed star Mintaka, Delta Orionis, is a 2.2 magnitude brilliant white and pale violet multiple star system in the Belt of the Hunter, Orion Constellation. The traditional name Mintaka comes from the Arabic word منطقة (manṭaqa) which means the belt. From the northern hemisphere facing south, Mintaka is the star on the west or right in Orion’s Belt. From the southern hemisphere facing north it is on the left, or eastern side.

The Belt of Orion is make up of three stars, Mintaka (Delta Orionis), Alnitak (Zeta Orionis) and Alnilam (Epsilon Orionis).

Degree*

21 ♊ 51
22 ♊ 10
22 ♊ 24
22 ♊ 35
22 ♊ 59

Fixed Star

Capella
Phact
Mintaka
El Nath
Ensis

Orb

2°40′
2°00′
2°10′
2°20′
1°20′

Mintaka Star Astrology

Fixed star Mintaka is of the nature of Saturn and Mercury. It gives good fortune. [1]

Mintaka alone portents good fortune as regards the growing of grain crops. [2]

Mintaka is of a Saturn-Mercury styling, even though it is hardly separable by longitude from El Nath in Taurus. They are about 30° apart in declination, once used more in astrology than now. This proximity to the bull’s Horn inspires us to see Orion’s belt stars as protection for him, and so this star does show that quality in our horoscopes if well aspected: we protect others and are ourselves protected. To that extent, it moderates the Mars effect of El Nath, but at the same time warns not to take silly risks for the sake of ‘bullfighting’ our way in life. [3]

Mintaka rules the left side of the 8th Vertebra (First Dorsal) in the human body. [5]

Orion’s Belt is to give strength, energy, industry, organizing abilities, notoriety, good fortune, lasting happiness, a sharp mind and a good memory. [1]

These stars in medieval times were said to presage those who were “passionately devoted to hunting, but not noble hunting with falcon or bow”. [2]

Orion’s Belt

Orion’s Belt [en.wikipedia.org]

Constellation Orion is the most important constellation in the heavens outside the zodiac. In judicial astrology this is the constellation of war. In the Middle Ages this constellation was said to be a direful influence to agriculture, being the “the veri cuttrhrote of cattle” and presaging violent storms and much rain. In genethiacal charts the indications are for arrogance, rebellion, strength, and courage. Tetrabiblos lists the stars in the shoulder of Orion to have a nature similar to that of Mars and Mercury, and the other bright stars in the constellation to be similar to the natures of Jupiter and Saturn. [2]

According to Ptolemy the bright stars with the exception of Betelgeuse and Bellatrix are like Jupiter and Saturn. It is said to give a strong and dignified nature, self-confidence, inconstancy, arrogance, violence, impiety, prosperity in trade and particularly by voyages or abroad, but danger of treachery and poison. It was thought by the Romans to be very harmful to cattle and productive of storms. [1]

Mintaka Star, Delta Orionis

Mintaka Star, Delta Orionis [astropixels.com]

Mintaka Star Conjunctions

Ascendant conjunct Mintaka: Legacies, love or dissipation, gravity and austerity. [1]

When rising, Alnilam, together with Alnitak and Mintaka, portend irreligious and treacherous individuals. In a female chart, any of these three stars rising portend a shrew.[2]

Descendant conjunct Mintaka: When setting and aspected by Mars any of these three stars indicate individuals who will incur all kinds of dangers. [2]

Sun conjunct Mintaka: Discreet, cautious, somewhat changeable. Notoriety, good fortune, lasting happiness. [1]

Moon conjunct Mintaka: Active, sharp, alert in business, public position, many enemies more successful in business. Blindness of at least one eye, new and influential friends, valuable gifts, love of respectable women. If a malefic be with Markab, drowning. If the moon is with Saturn also, drowning and assassination. [1]

Mercury conjunct Mintaka: Studious, fond of seclusion, deliberate and fixed mind, little sympathy or disagreements with relatives. [1]

This position keeps the respiratory system balanced. The system is so balanced that these individuals do not contract asthma, colds, or other respiratory disorders. [4]

Venus conjunct Mintaka: Public position, enmity of women, love disappointments. [1]

Mars conjunct Mintaka: Energetic, quick mind, good speaker and debater, quarrelsome, strong passions. [1]

In a female chart, any of these three stars aspected by both Mars and a benefic portend a shrew.[2]

This causes inflammation of the bronchial passages. They may break out in rashes easily across the chest or back when they have problems keeping their body temperature at the correct degree. Many difficulties in this are caused by the subconscious which is the trigger mechanism here. These persons are not aware that this is so. They can go for long periods without this occurring until such time as they collect too many difficulties in their subconscious. [4]

Jupiter conjunct Mintaka: High position in law or church, studious and philosophical mind, gain through inheritance. [1]

Saturn conjunct Mintaka: Far-seeing, studious, good judge of human nature, psychic, domestic disharmony, sickness to family. [1]

Aspected by Saturn, the indications are for excellent fishermen [2]

Uranus conjunct Mintaka: Selfish, studious, eccentric, difficult to get on with, losses through lawsuits and business, successful in middle age but poverty at end of life, favorable for domestic matters, death from consumption. [1]

Neptune conjunct Mintaka: Thoughtful, studious, keeps discoveries to himself, sarcastic writer, generous but not wealthy, rarely marries, death unattended in old age. [1]

Pluto conjunct Mintaka: This position provides these persons with an overflow of energy. They would have a quickening of the respiratory function causing these individuals to breathe quickly, thus bringing on hyperventilation. There is just too much energy here and they are not able to control it. [4]

References

1. Fixed Stars and Constellations in Astrology, Vivian E. Robson, 1923, p.55, 156, 177.
2. Fixed Stars and Judicial Astrology, George Noonan, 1990, p.59.
3. The Living Stars, Dr. Eric Morse, 1988, p.135.
4. The Fixed Star Health and Behavior Imbalance, Ted George and Barbara Parker, 1985, p.33.

* All fixed star positions are for the year 2000. Add one degree per 72 years to correct for precession.

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